The December 7 event is part of Oregon Humanities’ statewide Conversation Project. NORTH BEND, While faith and politics have long been taboo subjects in polite conversation, it’s no secret that people’s political affiliations and support are often influenced by their faiths. At the same time, faith-based movements, such as the Religious Right of the 1980s, have exhibited great power in political arenas. How do our faith systems influence our political beliefs—and vice versa—today, both in Oregon and nationally? How do our religious ideas and political identities mix and what it means for our common life together? This is the focus of “Faith and Politics in Oregon and Beyond” a free conversation with Russ Pierson on Saturday, December 7 at 3 pm at North Bend Public Library. This program is hosted by the North Bend Public Library and sponsored by Oregon Humanities. Russ Pierson is a GreenFaith fellow, earned a doctor of ministry in global leadership from George Fox University, and holds several sustainability-related certifications. He is dean of the Lane Community College Florence Center on the Oregon coast and he has a mixed-up background in construction management, the faith community, and higher education. Through the Conversation Project, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future. For more information about this free community discussion, please contact Drea Douglas at 541-756-0400 or ddouglas@coastlinelibrarynetwork.org. Oregon Humanities (921 SW Washington, Suite 150; Portland, OR 97205) connects Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities. More information about Oregon Humanities’ programs and publications, which include the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Bridging Oregon, Public Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine, can be found at oregonhumanities.org. Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust.

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